Writing and reading email is inherently a text-based workflow. Yes, there’s HTML mails and attachments, but at the core email is probably the place where many people write and consume the most text. To utilize the best text-processing program available makes a lot of sense.

When combined with other powerful features of Emacs (such as Org mode for organizing mails into projects and todos), processing mails within Emacs not only makes a lot of sense, but becomes a powerhouse.

Now, some people refrain from using Emacs (or similarly good mail user agents), because they are afraid that such a setup will not...

— title: Impressions from EmacsConf 2019 authors: Alain M. Lafon, Phil Hofmann, Alex Mihov category: Emacs date-published: 2019-11-10 tags:

  • emacs
  • freesoftware
  • opensource
  • lisp
  • conference
  • publicappearance

uuid: c1cc3a48-12f4-4cb2-987c-2536857dc7eb description: >- Some images from the official Zürich Satellite of EmacsConf 2019. featured-image: /img/2019/11/emacsconf/philandalainsettingup.jpg —

EmacsConf 2019 is over. At 200ok, we were very happy that we have been able to host one of two official satellites - with the FSF being the second hosts. It was great fun to enjoy the talks together, share food and have interesting discussions.

We want to especially thank the organizers Amin Bandali and Sacha Chua for their great effort and determination...

— title: EmacsConf 2019 goodies authors: Alain M. Lafon category: Emacs date-published: 2019-10-27 tags:

  • emacs
  • freesoftware
  • opensource
  • conference

uuid: 788dcc37-d44f-4f93-bf8a-0000c1ede00f description: >- The Free Software Foundation has kindly provided us with a set of great goodies that we're giving away at the Zurich satellite featured-image: /img/2019/11/emacsconf2019goodies.jpg —

EmacsConf 2019 is coming closer! Save the date: November 2nd, 2019.

EmacsConf is the conference about the joy of Emacs, Emacs Lisp, and memorizing key sequences.

The Free Software Foundation has kindly provided us with a set of great goodies that we're giving away at the Zurich satellite. Here's a little preview:

...

— title: Announcing the official EmacsConf 2019 Zurich satellite authors: Alain M. Lafon, Phil Hofmann category: Emacs date-published: 2019-09-17 tags:

  • emacs
  • opensource
  • freesoftware
  • lisp
  • conference
  • publicappearance

uuid: 4d31cac9-e74b-4e88-b274-1a588dbc0ced description: >- EmacsConf 2019 will have a satellite venue in Zurich, Switzerland where we can gather, watch remote and hold live talks, enjoy good discussions as well as food. featured-image: /img/2019/09/emacsconf-logo.png —

Save the date: EmacsConf 2019 is happening on November 2, 2019.

EmacsConf is the conference about the joy of Emacs, Emacs Lisp, and memorizing key sequences.

We are happy to announce the official EmacsConf 2019 Zurich (CH) satellite! For the satellite, there will be...

Recently at ClojureD, Josef introduced me to a tool which quickly rose to fame (in the JavaScript world): prettier. It is an opinionated code formatter for various languages - this paradigm probably got popular ever since Go started to ship such a formatter in the core tooling. I knew the paradigm and prettier itself from blog posts, but didn’t really try to use it so far.

Generally speaking I liked the idea of having my code automatically formatted in Emacs whilst adhering to configured linters such as eslint. However, from the docs it was much too complicated...

By default, the great Mail User Agent MU4E prefers Plain Text mails over HTML. This configuration can be overridden via mu4e-view-prefer-html, but there’s probably few of us who would do that.

However, you might still see a whole lot of HTML emails. And when you check if they have a plain text version, they might have one! There’s a reason for that. MU4E has a ‘HTML over plain text’ heuristic with this official rationale:

Ratio between the length of the html and the plain text part below which mu4e will consider the plain text part to be ‘This messages requires html’...

Lean back and relax while enjoying a deep dive into the wonderful world of the Emacs editor. Emacs renaissance came with the advent of Clojure and undoubtedly is the most popular editor among Clojurians today. Of course there is a lot more you can do with Emacs, but much like playing an instrument, great skill only comes with practice.

You neither need to be an Emacs user nor a Clojure Programmer and neither do you need to contemplate about becoming one either to enjoy this talk. Much like you don’t become a professional musician by attending a concert, but it might...

You might be familiar with the great vidir utility which allows editing of contents of a directory in a text editor. This is a great concept, because editors are great at text manipulation - which in turn yields more efficiency for mass renaming/moving/deletion than typing commands in a shell or using a GUI. vidir is a great tool, there’s no argument to be had - it’s even completely decoupled from the actual $EDITOR used. If you’re using Debian, it’s contained in the moretools package (which has other helpful utilities).

However, if you’re using Emacs as your editor, there’s no...

tramp-mode is great for editing files remotely, but sometimes having a shell and Emacs together on the same file can be invaluable.

eshell opens up a shell which is like a regular Unix shell, but is written completely in Elisp, so it’s built-in to Emacs and is completely portable. eshell has many interesting properties, but let’s focus on editing files remotely.

When in eshell, it is possible to change the working directory into a remote directory with the same syntax as tramp-mode. Yes, no manual ssh-ing to the remote machine, it’s more like a fuse-sshfs connection, but without fuse and without the...